Courses on Offer Spring 2020

122E. Dr. Inez Yarborough Liggins – Special Topics: African Dance

Tuesday / Thursday from 9:30-10:45 AM in Scales Fine Art Center D-101

An intensive study of selected topics in dance. May be repeated.

HST 105A. Dr. Anthony Parent – Africa in World History

Monday / Wednesday from 12:30-1:45 PM in Tribble Hall A-102

Examines the continent of Africa from prehistory to the present in global perspective, as experienced and understood by Africans themselves. (CD, D)

HST 105B. Dr. Anthony Parent – Africa in World History

Monday / Wednesday from 2:00-3:15 PM in Tribble Hall A-102

Examines the continent of Africa from prehistory to the present in global perspective, as experienced and understood by Africans themselves. (CD, D)

HST 269A. Dr. Nate Plageman – African History since 1850

Tuesday / Thursday from 11:00 – 12:15 PM in Tribble Hall B-117

Overview of African history, beginning with the period following the abolition of the Trans Atlantic Slave Trade and ending with contemporary challenges of independent African nations. Emphasizes sub-Saharan African perspectives, initiatives, and historical agency. (CD)

HST 341A. Dr. Anthony Parent – Africans in the Atlantic World, 1750-1815

Tuesday / Thursday from 12:30 – 1:45 PM in Tribble Hall A -102

Explores Africans’ experience in the Atlantic world (Africa, Europe and the Americas) during the era of the slave trade by examining their encounters with Indians and Europeans and their adjustment to slave traders in West Africa. Also listed as AES 341. (CD)

MUS 209A. Dr. Elizabeth Anne Clendinning – Music of World Cultures

Tuesday / Thursday from 12:30 – 1:45 PM in Scales Fine Arts Center M-308

Survey of music in selected societies around the world. Topics will be selected from the following areas of concentration: India, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Western Europe, Latin America, and vernacular music of the United States (including jazz). Students complete a project or projects on the technical or theoretical aspects of the music of world cultures. Designed for music majors and minors in cultural resource preservation. Meets concurrently with MUS 109. Credit cannot be received for both MUS 109 and 209. P-MUS 172 or POI. (CD, D)

POL 242C. Dr. Lina Benabdallah – Topics in Comparative Politics: China / Africa Encounters

Wednesday / Friday from 11:00 – 12:15 PM in Manchester Hall 17

This course surveys the contemporary relations between China and African countries. It explores the relations from a mix of economic, security, cultural, and development perspectives.

POL 252H. Dr. Lina Benabdallah – Topics in International Politics: Africa & International Relation

Wednesday from 2:00 – 4:30 PM in Manchester Hall 125

The field of International Relations (IR) is Euro-Centric. Its theories, its concepts, and history of development all put Europe/the West at the center. When applied to Africa, IR has a huge gap. This class will examine how the field of IR could expand and be rectified to include non-Eurocentric contexts, such as Africa.

REL 107A. Dr. Simeon Ilesanmi – Introduction to African Religions

Monday / Wednesday from 2:00 – 3:15 PM in Wingate Hall 209

A study of the basic features of African religious systems and institutions, with focus on the cultural, economic and political factors that have informed global preservations of an African worldview. (CD, D)

REL 110B. Dr. Kimberly Wortmann – Introduction to Islamic Traditions

Tuesday / Thursday from 9:30 -10:45 AM in Wingate Hall 306

Examination of the origins and development of Islam. Attention is given to the formation of Islamic faith and practice. (CD, D)

REL 110C. Dr. Kimberly Wortmann – Introduction to Islamic Traditions

Tuesday / Thursday from 12:30 – 1:45 PM in Wingate Hall 306

Examination of the origins and development of Islam. Attention is given to the formation of Islamic faith and practice. (CD, D)

REL 362B. Dr. Kimberly Wortmann – Topics in Islam: Islam and Youth in Africa

Wednesday / Friday from 9:30 – 10:45 AM in Wingate Hall 206

Who are the youth? What defines individual and collective youth identities? What particular roles have African Muslim youth played in shaping the social, political, religious and artistic developments of a continent since the wave of independence movements of the 1950s and 60s? Can we identify any similarities in the religious experiences and youth culture of a Salafi member of the Ansar al-Sunna in the Sudan and a Rasta Sufi in Mali? What does an Algerian soccer player who fasts during the World Cup have in common with a Somali-American Sports Illustrated model?

We will approach these questions and others from an anthropology of religion perspective. This means that we will pay particular attention to the idea of “lived Islam”, or the ways in which Islamic beliefs and practices intersect with the everyday experiences of Muslim youth across the African continent and in the diaspora. We will also study how Muslim youth draw on their religious tradition when they participate in local and international debates on issues such as economic development, education, migration, LGBTQ+ rights, female genital mutilation (FGM), HIV and AIDS, and political violence.

African Studies Program Tribble Hall A-105 ~ 758-3758